Clarence W. de Silva

     Professor of Mechanical Engineering

     University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada


Introduction

Abstract

Mechatronic systems are good examples of engineering dynamic systems incorporating multiple physical domains. They will typically consist of several different types of interconnected components and elements, each component belonging to one or more domains, particularly, mechanical, electrical/electronic, fluid, and thermal domains. In view of dynamic coupling and interactions between components, an accurate design, integration, and development of a mechatronic system should consider the entire system concurrently, in an integrated manner, unlike in the traditional design methodologies which are single-criterion and sequential. Since dynamic modeling is key to proper design, simulation, control, and evaluation, the modeling of a mechatronic system should use as well an integrated or concurrent multi-domain approach, where all domains (mechanical, electrical, thermal, fluid, etc.) are treated together. Furthermore, it is clearly advantages to use similar or analogous approaches to model devices in different domains. In other words, the modeling approach must be unified. The talk will first introduce the field of Mechatronics and highlight why integrated and unified approaches are desirable in the development of mechatronic systems. Then it will present some useful considerations of multi-domain modeling, as applicable in the design, development, control, and evaluation/simulation of mechatronic systems. Examples will be provided to justify the use of an integrated and unified approach of modeling in mechatronic systems. The approach of linear graphs will be presented as an appropriate graphical representation in the modeling analysis of a mechatronic system. In this context how the familiar techniques of Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits may be extended to mechanical systems and converting a multi-domain model into an equivalent single-domain model will be illustrated.

Speaker Biography

Clarence W. de Silva, P.Eng., Fellow ASME, Fellow IEEE, and Fellow Canadian Academy of Engineering, Fellow Royal Society of Canada Academic Qualifications: Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, 1978 Ph.D., University of Cambridge, England, 1998 D.Eng. (Honorary), University of Waterloo, Canada, 2008 Appointments: Senior Canada Research Chair in Mechatronics and Industrial Automation, Professorial Fellow Peter Wall Scholar NSERC-BC Packers Professor of Industrial Automation Mobil Endowed Chair Professor Honorary Chair Professor Awards: Paynter Outstanding Investigator Award and Takahashi Education Award, ASME Dynamic Systems & Control Division; Killam Research Prize; Outstanding Engineering Educator Award, IEEE Canada; Lifetime Achievement Award, World Automation Congress; IEEE Third Millennium Medal; Meritorious Achievement Award, Association of Professional Engineers of BC; Outstanding Contribution Award, IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society. Fellowships: Lilly Fellow; NASA-ASEE Fellow; Senior Fulbright Fellow to Cambridge University; Fellow of the Advanced Systems Institute of BC; Killam Fellow; Erskine Fellow. Editorial Boards: 14 journals including IEEE Trans. Control System Technology and ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement & Control; Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Control and Intelligent Systems; Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Knowledge-Based Intelligent Engineering Systems; Senior Technical Editor, Measurements and Control; Regional Editor, North America, Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence—IFAC International Journal of Intelligent Real-Time Automation; and Management Committee, IEEE-ASME Transaction in Mechatronics. Publications: 23 technical books, 19 edited books, 51 book chapters, 243 journal articles, and 268 conference papers.



     Jaspal Subhlok

     Professor in Computer Science

     University of Houston


Introduction

Abstract

Video recordings of classroom lectures are a proven and popular learning companion. Our surveys of students at the University of Houston, dating back over a decade, have consistently revealed that is students consider video lectures extremely valuable and use them for diverse purposes such as reviewing difficult concepts and preparing for quizzes and ii) a major shortcoming of the video format is the difficulty in quickly reaching the content of interest. The goal of the ICS Videos project is to enable users to rapidly search and access a topic of interest in a video with automated content based video indexing, search within and across videos, and text captioning. This lecture will report on the development and evaluation of ICS videos framework by integrating and enhancing diverse technologies spanning optical character recognition, image analysis, machine learning, text analysis, and natural language processing. Assessment of the value of ICS Videos as a learning resource, based on 1000s of student surveys and interviews across the departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth and Atmospheric Science, Physics, and Psychology, will also be reported. ICS videos framework is freely available to interested users.

Speaker Biography

Jaspal Subhlok is a Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Houston. He has served as the Chair of the Computer Science Department since 2010. His research interests are primarily focused on Parallel and Distributed Computing and Educational Technologies. He was recently awarded the University of Houston Teaching Excellence Award for Innovative Educational Technologies. He is also a recipient of the UH Department of Computer Science award for Teaching Excellence as well as for Research Excellence. He co-hosted a radio show called Border Crossings from 2002 to 2008.



     Yongjie Jessica Zhang

     Professor in Mechanical Engineering

     Courtesy Appointment in Biomedical Engineering Carnegie Mellon University


Introduction

Speaker Biography

Yongjie Jessica Zhang is a Professor in Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University with a courtesy appointment in Biomedical Engineering. She received her B.Eng. in Automotive Engineering, and M.Eng. in Engineering Mechanics from Tsinghua University, China; and M.Eng. in Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics and Ph.D. in Computational Engineering and Sciences from Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), The University of Texas at Austin. After staying two years in ICES as a postdoctoral fellow, she joined CMU in 2007 as an assistant professor, and then was promoted to an associate professor in 2012 and a full professor in 2016. Her research interests include computational geometry, mesh generation, computer graphics, visualization, finite element method, isogeometric analysis and their application in computational biomedicine, material sciences and engineering. She has co-authored over 140 publications in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings, and received Autodesk Best Paper Award 1st Place in SIAM Conference on Solid and Physical Modeling 2015, the Best Paper Award in CompIMAGE’16 conference and one of the 5 Most Highly Cited Papers Published in Computer-Aided Design During 2014-2016. She recently published a book entitled “Geometric Modeling and Mesh Generation from Scanned Images” with CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group. She is the recipient of Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, NSF CAREER Award, Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, USACM Gallagher Young Investigator Award, Clarence H. Adamson Career Faculty Fellow in Mechanical Engineering, George Tallman Ladd Research Award, and Donald L. & Rhonda Struminger Faculty Fellow.